Climate Mayors, in Partnership With World Resources Institute, Hosts Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh, New Orleans Mayor Latoya Cantrell for Dialogue About a Sustainable and Just Economic Recovery

The livestream panel was the fifth in the Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery, and focused on how the federal government can support and accelerate climate policies that have been successful in cities around the country 

Watch the full discussion HERE.

November 17, 2020 – Today, Climate Mayors Chair Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh, Steering Committee Member New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell and U.S. Director of World Resources Institute (WRI) Dan Lashof participated in a panel discussion as part of the Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery. The discussion focused on climate action needed at all levels of government during COVID-19 and the future of U.S. climate policy.

Today’s conversation was the fifth in a Climate Mayors event series advocating for national leadership to prioritize recovery policies that are environmentally sustainable and socially just in the time of COVID-19, and the first in the series to discuss the future of U.S. climate action in the wake of the presidential election. The discussion was moderated by Justin Worland, senior correspondent for TIME Magazine covering climate change and the environment.

“There are many parallels between the COVID-19 crisis and the climate crisis,” said Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh. “COVID-19 has made it clear how important it is that we plan for the future; listen to the scientists; and make sustainability a fundamental value of our society. It’s also shown us how important it is for us to work together. Our national recovery from COVID-19 must be rooted in green, equitable solutions that create opportunities for populations that have been hit hardest by the twin pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism. Cities have long been leaders in this work, and will continue to do so through coalitions like the Climate Mayors. Today’s discussion was an opportunity to discuss our shared goals moving forward, and I look forward to leading many more of these conversations in the months ahead, as the Climate Mayors’ new Chair.”

“As we have seen with the COVID-19 pandemic and with climate change, our cities have been at the forefront of the impacts, and the needs far exceed the resources available,” said New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell. “Both ongoing crises demand equitable solutions across the board, and we need leadership with a plan to address them. This is why conversations across different areas and sectors will be critical in developing future-oriented solutions for an equitable and green recovery.”

“For the last 4 years climate leadership in the United States has, of necessity, come from cities, states, and companies,” said Dan Lashof, U.S. Director of World Resources Institute. “With an incoming federal administration committed to build back better from COVID-19 by prioritizing climate action, leadership from Climate Mayors will remain essential to tackling the climate crisis at the pace and scale required by science and expected by citizens and the international community.”

Mayors and their partners highlighted how environmental initiatives stimulate local economies, create jobs, improve public health, and reduce carbon emissions amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants also discussed the ways that sustainability policies can prioritize frontline communities and communities of color that are more likely to be affected by pollution and the negative impacts of climate change.

“As we usher in an administration committed to upholding the Paris Agreement and reversing the current administration’s harmful environmental rollbacks, we must not lose sight of our call to action for a just and sustainable economic recovery,” said James Ritchotte, Director of Climate Mayors. “A green economic stimulus isn’t just an investment in our planet — it’s an investment in our economy, our public health, and the long-term prosperity of our country. This year, mayors across the country have shown leadership on the frontlines of the climate crisis, the racial justice crisis, the economic crisis and the public health crisis. And as we prepare for a new year and a new administration, Climate Mayors are eager to partner with the federal government on solutions that build resilience and address all of these crises simultaneously.”

Earlier events in the series featured Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer, Miami Mayor Francis Suarez, Columbia Mayor Stephen Benjamin, and U.S. Representative Kathy Castor, Chair of the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis (watch the Southeast event here); Texas leaders Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, Austin Mayor Steve Adler, and San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg (watch the Texas event here); Great Lakes leaders Madison Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway, Saint Paul Mayor Melvin Carter, and Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes (listen to the full Great Lakes event here); and Ohio Valley leaders Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley, and Youngstown Mayor Tito Brown (watch the Ohio Valley event here).

For more Information on the Climate Mayors network, please visit www.climatemayors.org.

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About Climate Mayors

Representing over 74 million Americans from 48 states, Climate Mayors is a peer-to-peer network of 468 U.S. city mayors who have committed to fighting climate change. Originally founded in 2014, the network’s ranks swelled to almost 400 mayors in response to the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. Climate Mayors commit to taking ambitious action to meet each of their cities’ current climate goals, while working together towards achieving our national Paris targets. Climate Mayors was founded by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, and is Chaired by Martin J. Walsh (Boston) and Co-Chaired by Sylvester Turner (Houston). For more information, visit www.climatemayors.org and follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Media Contact: Melody Meyer, mmeyer@bpimedia.com; Grace Hemming, ghemming@bpimedia.com

Climate Mayors Announces New Chair, Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh

Mayor Walsh previously served as Co-Chair of the network since its launch in 2014

Outgoing Chair Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti remains in Climate Mayors’ leadership as a member of its Steering Committee  

November 16, 2020 — Today, Climate Mayors, the network of 468 U.S. mayors across the country committed to leading bold climate action and upholding the Paris Climate Agreement, announced that Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh will become the next Chair of the nationwide coalition. In this role, Mayor Walsh will help catalyze climate-forward actions taken at the local level, provide an example of climate action for leaders at all levels of government, and advocate for an economic recovery founded in equity and environmental stewardship. Mayor Walsh succeeds Mayor Eric Garcetti of Los Angeles, co-founder of Climate Mayors, who has served as the network’s Chair since its launch in 2014. Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner will continue in his leadership role as Co-Chair of the network.

Mayor Walsh has been a climate champion for Boston and has made bold climate action a top priority since beginning his term in 2014. The City of Boston’s 2019 update to the Climate Action Plan outlined a five year roadmap to accelerate action towards achieving carbon neutrality by 2050, and put Boston on track to meet the goals laid out in the Paris Climate Agreement. Boston continues to build a successful track record of driving down emissions while simultaneously preparing for sea level rise, extreme temperatures and storms. In each year of his tenure so far, Boston has ranked among the top two cities in the country for energy efficiency by the American Council on an Energy-Efficient Economy. The City is implementing solutions to make Boston’s most vulnerable communities more resilient to the impacts of climate change through Climate Ready Boston and Resilient Boston Harbor, a comprehensive and transformative vision to increase access and open space along Boston’s 47 mile shoreline while better protecting the city during a major flooding event.

“I’m very proud to be named Chair of the Climate Mayors,” said Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh. “As Mayors, we’re close to the people we serve. We see how climate change is already impacting the residents in our cities, and we know how important it is for us to take decisive action for the sake of public safety and public health. American cities have led on climate action for a long time, and especially over the last four years. As we welcome in a federal administration committed to urgent, bold climate policies, the Climate Mayors are looking forward to accelerating our efforts.”

“Mayors see the impacts of climate change firsthand, and we are always first to propose, develop, and implement solutions to this existential challenge,” said Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti. “Cities will never shirk their responsibility to preserve our environment, invest in clean energy, and protect the health of our communities — and there is no one better than Mayor Walsh to carry forward our agenda, uphold the goals of the Paris Agreement, forge a future of sustainability, and deliver a green economy that works for everyone.”

“The COVID19 pandemic has strengthened the connection between climate change and community health, especially in our most vulnerable communities. Now more than ever before, a clean energy transition — driven by cities — is key to global economic recovery,” said Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner. “Over the past four years, Climate Mayors have stepped up to fill the gap when the federal government turned its back on climate action. The City of Houston – the Energy Capital of the World – stands ready to take immediate, bold action to reduce emissions in our city and build a low-carbon economy that can fuel cities across the planet. Mayor Walsh has made environmental justice and climate action a priority for Boston, and I look forward to working alongside him to make the US a leader in the global effort to reduce carbon emissions.”

“Since founding Climate Mayors in 2014, Mayor Garcetti has helped shape Climate Mayors into a robust, engaged network of more than 450 members and cemented it as a leading voice in climate advocacy,” said James Ritchotte, Director of Climate Mayors. “As we look ahead to this new phase under the leadership of Mayor Walsh, the Climate Mayors network expresses its deepest gratitude to Mayor Garcetti for galvanizing our membership and for his commitment to addressing the climate emergency. We’re honored to have Mayor Walsh serve as the new Chair, knowing that he will expand on this legacy, and drive an ambitious agenda focused on a green and equitable recovery across the country.”

Since being elected Mayor in 2013, Mayor Eric Garcetti has dedicated his tenure to making Los Angeles a global leader in climate action and catalyzing more climate action across the world. At the time he co-founded Climate Mayors in 2014, the network consisted of 24 members — in the six years since, Mayor Garcetti helped the network swell to 468 members across 48 states. As Chair of Climate Mayors, he long set an example for other members to follow and helped grow the Climate Mayors Electric Vehicle (EV) Purchasing Collaborative from 20 founding cities and two counties to where it stands today: 231 cities, counties, ports, universities and transit agencies committed to purchasing nearly 4,000 light duty EVs and buses. Last year, Mayor Garcetti launched Los Angeles’ Green New Deal — an ambitious update to the city’s first-ever Sustainable City pLAn — which serves as a comprehensive roadmap to protect the environment, strengthen the economy and build a more equitable future. He has put the city on track to a 45% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2025 and carbon neutrality by 2050.

Mayor Garcetti will remain in Climate Mayors leadership as a member of its Steering Committee. In 2019, Mayor Garcetti became Chair of C40 Cities, the international network of global cities committed to addressing climate change. As a leader with both Climate Mayors and C40, Mayor Garcetti will continue to foster close collaboration and partnership between the two networks.

Climate Mayors and its work to accelerate local climate progress across the country is made possible with support by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

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About Climate Mayors

Representing over 74 million Americans from 48 states, Climate Mayors is a peer-to-peer network of 468 U.S. city mayors who have committed to fighting climate change. Originally founded in 2014, the network’s ranks swelled to almost 400 mayors in response to the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. Climate Mayors commit to taking ambitious action to meet each of their cities’ current climate goals, while working together towards achieving our national Paris targets. Climate Mayors was founded by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, and is Chaired by Martin J. Walsh (Boston) and Co-Chaired by Sylvester Turner (Houston). For more information, please visit www.climatemayors.org.

Media Inquiries: Melody Meyer, mmeyer@bpimedia.com; Grace Hemming, ghemming@bpimedia.com

Climate Mayors, in Partnership With the University of Pittsburgh, Hosts Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley, and Youngstown Mayor Tito Brown for Dialogue About a Sustainable and Just Economic Recovery

The livestream panel was the fourth in the Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery, an event series running through the fall with leaders in different regions across the U.S.

Watch the full discussion HERE.

October 2, 2020 – Yesterday, Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley and Youngstown Mayor Tito Brown participated in a panel discussion as part of the Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery. The event convened like-minded institutions, partners, and policy makers for a discussion about successful climate initiatives in the Ohio Valley and ways that the panelists have collaborated to advance climate action both locally and nationally.

Yesterday’s conversation was the fourth in a Climate Mayors event series advocating for national leadership to prioritize recovery policies that are environmentally sustainable and socially just in the time of COVID-19. The discussion was moderated by CB Bhattacharya, H.J. Zoffer Chair in Sustainability and Ethics at the Katz Graduate School of Business at the University of Pittsburgh. Climate Mayors convened this event in partnership with the University of Pittsburgh Center for Sustainable Business.

“It is increasingly clear that we need to develop the resources and capacity to rebuild the communities that built America and the people that live in them. Fostering a just and sustainable clean energy transition is imperative,” said Climate Mayors Steering Committee member Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto. “We are losing time in competitive challenges between regions and countries to address the climate challenge, to develop the next generation technologies and invest in our infrastructure. We need to create an American Marshall Plan that leverages our financial capacity to create clean energy jobs. I am proud to join together with my fellow mayors to help shape and share this vision.”

“The City of Dayton is committed to move our community forward in a green and resilient direction. We will work to ensure that Dayton plans and executes our future activities in a way that acknowledges the need to reduce carbon emissions, be efficient in our energy consumption, and reverses environmental injustices,” said Climate Mayors member Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley. “Our new Sustainability Strategy promises a high quality of life and a healthy economy for our residents, businesses, institutions, and nonprofits in the future.”

“Cincinnati has laid the groundwork to construct the nation’s largest municipally-owned solar array that will take city administrative buildings off the grid and save our taxpayers money,” said Climate Mayors member Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley. “A cost-saving that will be critical as we continue to navigate the economic impact of COVID-19. Additionally, we have added a Climate Advisor to our Sustainability team to help build programs that address racial equity and energy-burden issues facing our city in light of the changes happening during the pandemic. As environmental stewards asking our residents and business owners to be more carbon-conscious, it is our job to lead that effort at the local level. Cincinnati’s sustainability team is already leading with the economy in mind, and our future is already better for it.”

“The City of Youngstown has begun to focus our efforts on dealing with our environment and preserving the future of our community,” said Climate Mayors member Youngstown Mayor Tito Brown. “We have begun a plan to reduce the carbon emissions by installing electric charging stations around the city, focusing on the uses of autonomous electric power public transportation and upgrading our street lights to LED lighting. The greater impact I can make today as Mayor will create a better future for my children and grandchildren.”

The next event in the Climate Mayors series will be a nationally-focused discussion later this fall. Mayors and their partners will highlight how environmental initiatives can help stimulate local economies, create jobs, improve public health, and reduce carbon emissions in the wake of COVID-19. They will also discuss the ways that their sustainability policies prioritize frontline communities and communities of color, who are more likely to be affected by pollution and the negative impacts of climate change.

“Over the past six months, mayors have been tasked with responding to a convergence of crises — COVID-19 and its economic fallout, climate change and the disasters it creates, and the racial inequity that’s been laid bare in our systems. Climate Mayors in the Ohio Valley and across the nation understand that our country needs a sustainable and equitable economic plan to properly recover from the turmoil and uncertainty of the past year,” said James Ritchotte, Director of Climate Mayors. “The leadership exemplified by Climate Mayors throughout the country, and paired with meaningful support from our federal government to implement these actions on a larger scale, will help launch this nation into a greener, more just future.”

Earlier events in the series featured Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer, Miami Mayor Francis Suarez, Columbia Mayor Stephen Benjamin, and US Representative Kathy Castor, Chair of the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis; (watch the Southeast event here) Texas leaders Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, Austin Mayor Steve Adler and San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg; (watch the Texas event here) and Great Lakes leaders Madison Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway, Saint Paul Mayor Melvin Carter, and Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes (listen to the full Great Lakes event here).

For more Information on upcoming events in Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery, please visit www.climatemayors.org.

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About Climate Mayors

Representing over 74 million Americans from 48 states, Climate Mayors is a peer-to-peer network of 467 U.S. city mayors who have committed to fighting climate change. Originally founded in 2014, the network’s ranks swelled to almost 400 mayors in response to the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. Climate Mayors commit to taking ambitious action to meet each of their cities’ current climate goals, while working together towards achieving our national Paris targets. Climate Mayors is founded and Chaired by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, and Co-Chaired by Mayors Sylvester Turner (Houston) and Martin J. Walsh (Boston). For more information, visit www.climatemayors.org and follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Media Contact: Melody Meyer, mmeyer@bpimedia.com; Grace Hemming, ghemming@bpimedia.com

Climate Mayors, in Partnership With the Mayors Innovation Project, Hosts Madison Mayor Rhodes-Conway, Saint Paul Mayor Carter, and Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Barnes for Dialogue About a Sustainable and Just Economic Recovery

The livestream panel was the third in the Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery, an event series running through the fall with leaders in different regions across the U.S.

Listen to the full discussion HERE.

September 16, 2020 – Today, Madison Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway, Saint Paul Mayor Melvin Carter, and Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes participated in a panel discussion as part of the Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery. The event convened like-minded institutions, partners, and policy makers for a discussion about successful climate initiatives in the Great Lakes and ways that the panelists have collaborated to advance climate action both locally and nationally.

Today’s conversation was the third in a Climate Mayors event series advocating for national leadership to prioritize recovery policies that are environmentally sustainable and socially just in the time of COVID-19. The discussion was moderated by Paul Robbins, dean of the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Climate Mayors convened this event in partnership with the Mayors Innovation Project at UW-Madison.

“At this moment in history, all mayors must think about how to reinvest in their communities. This creates a tremendous opportunity to invest not in the status quo, but in what we want – communities that are sustainable, resilient, and just,” said Climate Mayors Steering Committee member Madison Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway. “I appreciate Climate Mayors and Mayors Innovation Project creating this opportunity for me to talk with other Midwest leaders, and for leaders across the country to share their ideas and their successes.”

“COVID-19 has laid bare the very challenges we’ve fought so hard to overcome for more than a generation, and that’s why it’s critical that we build back better, even stronger, and more resilient communities,” said Climate Mayors Steering Committee member Saint Paul Mayor Melvin Carter. “The ongoing work of Climate Mayors across our nation continues to help all of us realize this vision.”

“Over the last several years, cities and states have been leading the way on tackling the climate crisis, and together, we’ve been able to make some significant strides forward,” said Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes. “But as we rebuild our communities and continue to respond to COVID-19, we must ensure that equity and sustainability are driving our recovery efforts, and environmental justice is at the center of this conversation going forward.”

The next event in the Climate Mayors series will highlight policies and initiatives undertaken by climate leaders in the Ohio Valley region. A nationally-focused discussion will follow later this fall. Mayors and their partners will highlight how environmental initiatives can help stimulate local economies, create jobs, improve public health, and reduce carbon emissions in the wake of COVID-19. They will also discuss the ways that their sustainability policies prioritize frontline communities and communities of color, who are more likely to be affected by pollution and the negative impacts of climate change.

“From the public health and economic disparities exposed by the COVID-19 pandemic to unprecedented natural disasters like the wildfires raging across the West, the past year has made clear that we need more sustainable and just systems,” said James Ritchotte, Director of Climate Mayors. “Climate Mayors in the Great Lakes and beyond are committed to implementing innovative solutions that tackle our climate crisis and simultaneously prioritize racial justice, job growth and public health. With the leadership of mayors and other elected officials, cities and states are making the transition to a more green and equitable economy and, with the right support from our federal government to amplify and accelerate existing efforts, we can ensure a more resilient and sustainable country that works better for all of our communities.”

Earlier events in the series featured Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer, Miami Mayor Francis Suarez, Columbia Mayor Stephen Benjamin, and US Representative Kathy Castor, Chair of the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis, (watch the Southeast event here) and Texas leaders Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, Austin Mayor Steve Adler and San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg (watch the Texas event here).

For more Information on upcoming events in Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery, please visit www.climatemayors.org.

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About Climate Mayors

Representing over 74 million Americans from 48 states, Climate Mayors is a peer-to-peer network of 464 U.S. city mayors who have committed to fighting climate change. Originally founded in 2014, the network’s ranks swelled to almost 400 mayors in response to the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. Climate Mayors commit to taking ambitious action to meet each of their cities’ current climate goals, while working together towards achieving our national Paris targets. Climate Mayors is founded and Chaired by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, and Co-Chaired by Mayors Sylvester Turner (Houston) and Martin J. Walsh (Boston). For more information, visit www.climatemayors.org and follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Media Contact: Melody Meyer, mmeyer@bpimedia.com; Grace Hemming, ghemming@bpimedia.com

Climate Mayors Hosts Houston Mayor Turner, San Antonio Mayor Nirenberg, and Austin Mayor Steve Adler for Dialogue About a Sustainable and Just Economic Recovery

The livestream panel was the second in the Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery, an event series running through the fall with leaders in different regions across the U.S.

Watch the full discussion HERE.

September 2, 2020 – Today, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, Austin Mayor Steve Adler, and San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg participated in a panel discussion as part of the Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery. The event convened like-minded institutions, partners, and policy makers for a discussion about successful climate initiatives in Texas and ways that the panelists have collaborated to advance climate action both locally and nationally.

Today’s conversation was the second in a Climate Mayors event series advocating for national leadership to prioritize recovery policies that are environmentally sustainable and socially just in the time of COVID-19. It was moderated by journalist Evan Smith, CEO and co-founder of The Texas Tribune.

“Now more than ever, mayors across the country are prioritizing a transition to a more sustainable, equitable and resilient economy — it is time our federal government do the same,” said Climate Mayors Co-Chair Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner. “Houston has seen firsthand how human-induced crises, like climate change and the worsening COVID-19 pandemic, can devastate communities and disproportionately harm our most vulnerable populations. With a sustainable recovery, we can confront environmental injustice, protect our communities, and pull our country out of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. For the future of Texas, we must meet this moment and invest in a sustainable future, and I’m proud to be in great company with my fellow Texan mayors who are doing just that.”

“Climate change is perhaps the defining challenge of our time. We must meet this challenge in ways that reflect the immediacy and extent of the crisis,” said Climate Mayors Steering Committee member Austin Mayor Steve Adler. “This is most true as it impacts our communities of color. They face disparities generally — and ones uniquely associated with climate change. We will use every tool we have to fight at the nexus of systemic inequities and climate change.”

“As Mayor of the 7th largest city in the nation, I am committed to ensuring the health and wellbeing of our residents. Being proactive about climate change in Texas means that we consider how extreme heat and severe storms affect our economy, infrastructure, workforce, and the families who call San Antonio home,” said Climate Mayors Steering Committee member San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg. “This is particularly important now while we are faced with addressing COVID-19, a recession, and systemic racism, our recovery must support our efforts to address the unfolding climate crisis. At the local level, we are proactively implementing policies, programs, and projects and embracing new technology to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions to reach carbon neutrality by 2050. We are focused on reducing energy and transportation consumption, advancing the circular economy, and promoting biodiversity and healthy ecosystems. So that our residents feel empowered to participate in the conversation, we have established climate advisory committees and a Mayor’s Youth Engagement Council for Climate Initiatives. Hearing all voices and perspectives is essential for a just, equitable and green recovery.”

Later events in the Climate Mayors series will highlight policies and initiatives undertaken by climate leaders in the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley regions, as well as a nationally-focused discussion in October. Mayors and their partners will highlight how environmental initiatives can help stimulate local economies, create jobs, improve public health, and reduce carbon emissions in the wake of COVID-19. They will also discuss the ways that their sustainability policies prioritize frontline communities and communities of color, who are more likely to be affected by pollution and the negative impacts of climate change.

“It’s become increasingly clear that climate change isn’t just an environmental issue — it is intrinsically tied to our public health, our economies, our national security, our housing, and our infrastructure,” said James Ritchotte, Director of Climate Mayors. “As seen by the recent wildfires in California and the devastation caused by Hurricane Laura in the Gulf, climate change is already here. In Texas and around the country, mayors are committed to climate-focused solutions that create good-paying jobs while prioritizing public health and racial justice. Houston, Austin and San Antonio have served as examples of climate leadership, and they’ll continue to lead the way in building an economy that is better than the one we leave behind.”

The first event in the series occurred July 23 and included Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer, Miami Mayor Francis Suarez, Columbia Mayor Stephen Benjamin, and US Representative Kathy Castor, Chair of the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis. Watch the first event in the series here.

For more Information on upcoming events in Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery, please visit www.climatemayors.org.

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About Climate Mayors

Representing over 74 million Americans from 48 states, Climate Mayors is a peer-to-peer network of 464 U.S. city mayors who have committed to fighting climate change. Originally founded in 2014, the network’s ranks swelled to almost 400 mayors in response to the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. Climate Mayors commit to taking ambitious action to meet each of their cities’ current climate goals, while working together towards achieving our national Paris targets. Climate Mayors is founded and Chaired by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, and Co-Chaired by Mayors Sylvester Turner (Houston) and Martin J. Walsh (Boston). For more information, visit www.climatemayors.org and follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Media Contact: Melody Meyer, mmeyer@bpimedia.com; Grace Hemming, ghemming@bpimedia.com

Orlando Mayor Dyer, Miami Mayor Suarez, Columbia Mayor Benjamin and US Rep. Castor Speak About a Sustainable and Just Economic Recovery

The livestream panel was the first in the Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery, an event series running through the fall with leaders in different regions across the U.S.

Watch the full panel discussion.

July 23, 2020 – Today, Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer, Miami Mayor Francis Suarez, Columbia Mayor Stephen Benjamin, and US Representative Kathy Castor participated in a panel discussion as part of the Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery. The event convened like-minded institutions, partners, and policy makers for a discussion about successful climate initiatives in the Southeastern U.S., and ways that the panelists have collaborated across different levels of government.

Convened one day after Climate Mayors sent a letter to Congressional leaders, today’s conversation was the first in a Climate Mayors event series advocating for national leadership to prioritize recovery policies that are environmentally sustainable and socially just in the time of COVID-19. It was moderated by veteran journalist Tom O’Hara of The Invading Sea, a collaboration of 26 news organizations that cover climate change in Florida.

“There has never been a better time in history to re-imagine the transition towards an equitable, clean, and sustainable future,” said Climate Mayors Steering Committee member Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer. “As we look to move forward, we have an opportunity to rebuild our economies by doubling-down on our climate action work, to enhance the energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality in our homes and workplaces, accelerate more renewable energy and catalyze clean transportation and mobility solutions, such as zero-emission electric buses and vehicles.”

“No matter how large and global issues such as climate change may be, as Mayors we understand and can often see first-hand the impact they have at our local levels, and witness the detrimental effects on people we know in our communities,” said Climate Mayors member Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin. “I am encouraged by the efforts of Climate Mayors who are developing the strategies to confront the climate-based threats, and pleased to join their ranks and seek the very real and actionable methods to adapt our local communities to overcoming those threats.”

“Today, we stand at the intersection of resiliency; a place where the many faces and forms of resilience converge and this panel should serve as a reminder for exactly that,” said Climate Mayors member Miami Mayor Francis Suarez. “Resiliency is never about just any one issue. Whether we’re establishing new clean-energy infrastructure or building up a food distribution system, genuine sustainability is a network and it makes me proud to be a member of an organization that tackles resilience from the root source.”

“Mayors and local leaders are taking crucial steps to make their communities more resilient, filling a leadership void left by a president who mocks science, ignores public health experts, and calls the climate crisis a hoax,” said Chair Kathy Castor of the U.S. House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis. “Now more than ever, these local leaders deserve a strong federal partner to boost their local economies, protect the health and safety of families, and solve the climate crisis. We must work together on climate solutions for communities across America, as we prioritize environmental justice, unite behind the science, and ensure a robust economic recovery in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Later events in the Climate Mayors series will highlight policies and initiatives undertaken by climate leaders in the Great Lakes region, Texas, and Pennsylvania. Mayors and their partners will highlight how environmental initiatives can help stimulate local economies, create jobs, improve public health, and reduce carbon emissions in the wake of COVID-19. They will also discuss the ways that their sustainability policies prioritize frontline communities and communities of color, who are more likely to be affected by pollution and the negative impacts of climate change.

“Mayors have long been on the frontlines of addressing critical issues in our communities, and in recent months they have responded to intersecting crises of COVID-19, climate change, racial inequity, and a rapid economic downturn,” said James Ritchotte, Director of Climate Mayors. “Climate Mayors are delivering results and leading important conversations about building a better tomorrow to ensure all communities are healthier, cleaner, and more resilient than before.”

For more Information on upcoming events in Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery, please visit www.climatemayors.org.

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About Climate Mayors

Representing 74 million Americans from 48 states, Climate Mayors is a peer-to-peer network of 461 U.S. city mayors who have committed to fighting climate change. Originally founded in 2014, the network’s ranks swelled to almost 400 mayors in response to the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. Climate Mayors commit to taking ambitious action to meet each of their cities’ current climate goals, while working together towards achieving our national Paris targets. Climate Mayors is founded and Chaired by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, and Co-Chaired by Mayors Sylvester Turner (Houston) and Martin J. Walsh (Boston). For more information, please visit www.climatemayors.org.

Media Contact: Melody Meyer, mmeyer@bpimedia.com; Grace Hemming, ghemming@bpimedia.com

Climate Mayors Urge Congressional Leadership to Advance a Green and Equitable Recovery

Dear Speaker Pelosi, Majority Leader McConnell, Minority Leader McCarthy, and Minority Leader Schumer,

We are at a pivotal moment in our nation’s history. We began the year committed to protecting human civilization and beating the ten-year clock counting down to massive, irreparable climate disruption. Three months in, an unimaginable public health emergency of COVID-19 has been accompanied by a profound economic crisis and a national reckoning with racial inequity faced by communities of color. These communities have long suffered disproportionately from air pollution and other toxic exposure and are now getting hit hardest by the health and economic impacts of this pandemic. As mayors and local leaders, we stand on the front lines of this moment – and we are determined to meet it with strength, resilience, resolve, and bold action to protect our planet and build a more just future for all Americans.

So far, Congress has passed important legislation to respond to the pandemic, invest in our small businesses, support working families, and increase our testing capacity. But these bills, while critical, remain incomplete. Our nation and our cities need our representatives in Washington D.C. to move forward with a bold and innovative recovery package that takes direct, strategic steps to lift up our most vulnerable residents and communities.

We need that kind of approach to continue managing the fallout from COVID-19 – much the same way we focus on equity and fairness in our work to tackle the climate crisis.

Climate Mayors – a  bipartisan network of over 450 U.S. mayors – is playing a leading role to preserve our environment, create good-paying green jobs, invest in clean air, clean water, and clean energy, and uphold the goals of the Paris Agreement at the local level. This commitment remains steadfast even in these times of turbulence and turmoil, and we will continue to prioritize policies and programs that help build for a better, more sustainable tomorrow.

As elected officials weigh the responses that incentivize a just, equitable, and sustainable economic recovery from this crisis, leaders in Congress should look no further than the recommendations from Climate Mayors attached to this letter. We lay out the core building blocks of a healthy, dynamic, fair economy founded on a level playing field – emphasizing innovation and infrastructure, lower energy costs, greater access to clean energy, and increased investment in public transit. We possess one of the greatest opportunities for economic growth and the reduction of greenhouse gases our generation has ever seen – and we have to seize it.

Cities across America have long demonstrated that economic growth and environmental stewardship go hand in hand – and now, our federal government can show the world that investments in a zero-carbon economy are investments in the future of our workforce, the well-being of generations, and the resilience of our infrastructure and public spaces. This moment demands that we accelerate our efforts to drive ambitious, systemic change.

Times of crisis can lead to confusion, or clarity. We Climate Mayors are expressing to our congressional leadership a shared clarity that we must tackle these crises together based on the following principles:

  1. Build for a Better Future: Returning to the status quo is not sufficient in meeting the challenges of climate change and inequities in our society. We must increase our resolve and ambition to reinvest in America’s communities.
  2. Lead with Equity: Federal investments in our municipalities must prioritize those communities who have been left behind, and frontline communities and people of color who have been disproportionately impacted by the effects of climate change and COVID-19.
  3. Prioritize Multiple Benefits: The best investments will create jobs, strengthen community cohesion and resilience, and improve health outcomes in our cities and towns.

Cities throughout the United States are under tremendous pressure. In the face of the immediate crises – as well as the omnipresent threat of climate change – we encourage Congress to look to our local governments and communities to find meaningful solutions to these shared challenges. If fully funded, effectively implemented, and flexible enough to adapt locally, the policies highlighted in the Annex attached will have a lasting impact on our ability to meet the scope and scale of the challenges before us.

Thank you for your consideration of these recommendations. We look forward to working with you to build a better future behind a clear vision for protecting the environment and making our economy work for everyone.

Respectfully,

Chair & Co-Chairs 

Mayor Eric Garcetti
Los Angeles, CA

Mayor Marty Walsh
Boston, MA

Mayor Sylvester Turner
Houston, TX

Steering Committee

Mayor Tim Keller
Albuquerque, NM

Mayor Ethan Berkowitz
Anchorage, AK

Mayor Steve Adler
Austin, TX

Mayor Michael Cahill
Beverly, MA

Mayor James Brainard
Carmel, IN

Mayor Eric Johnson
Dallas, TX

Mayor Michael Hancock
Denver, CO

Mayor Frank Cownie
Des Moines, IA

Mayor Mike Duggan
Detroit, MI

Mayor James Hovland
Edina, MN

Mayor Lucy Vins
Eugene, OR

Mayor Lioneld Jordan
Fayetteville, AR

Mayor Kirk Caldwell
Honolulu, HI

Mayor Greg Fischer
Louisville, KY

Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway
Madison, WI

Mayor LaToya Cantrell
New Orleans, LA

Mayor Bill de Blasio
New York City, NY

Mayor Buddy Dyer
Orlando, FL

Mayor Kate Gallego
Phoenix, AZ

Mayor Bill Peduto
Pittsburgh, PA

Mayor Melvin Carter
Saint Paul, MN

Mayor Ron Nirenberg
San Antonio, TX

Mayor Jane Castor
Tampa, FL

Membership

Mayor Kathy Sheehan
Albany, NY

Mayor Justin Wilson
Alexandria, VA

Mayor Jeanne Sorg
Ambler, PA

Mayor Gary Goosman
Amesville, OH

Mayor Terence Roberts
Anderson, SC

Mayor Christopher Taylor
Ann Arbor, MI

Michael Winkler
Arcata, CA

Mayor Nancy Kaboolian
Ardsley, NY

Mayor Esther Manheimer
Asheville, NC

Mayor Torre
Aspen, CO

Mayor Keisha Bottoms
Atlanta, GA

Mayor Bernard Young
Baltimore, MD

Mayor Lee Kyriacou
Beacon, NY

Mayor Denny Doyle
Beaverton, OR

Mayor Jesse Arreguín
Berkeley, CA

Mayor Lauren McLean
Boise, ID

Mayor Sam Weaver
Boulder, CO

Mayor Steven B. Grant
Boynton Beach, FL

Mayor Chris Mehl
Bozeman, MT

Mayor Eric Mamula
Breckenridge, CO

Mayor Terry O’Connell
Brisbane, CA

Mayor Emily Beach
Burlingame, CA

Mayor Miro Weinberger
Burlington, VT

Mayor Sumbul Siddiqui
Cambridge, MA

Mayor Bob Hoog
Cape Canaveral, FL

Mayor Albert Robles
Carson, CA

Mayor Pam Hemminger
Chapel Hill, NC

Mayor John Tecklenburg
Charleston, SC

Mayor Vi Lyles
Charlotte, NC

Mayor Lori Lightfoot
Chicago, IL

Mayor John Cranley
Cincinnati, OH

Mayor Larry Schroeder
Claremont, CA

Mayor Charlene Lovett
Claremont, NH

Mayor Louis Sarbone
Coconut Creek, FL

Mayor Patrick L. Wojahn
College Park, MD

Mayor Brian Treece
Columbia, MO

Mayor Stephen K. Benjamin
Columbia, SC

Mayor Andrew Ginther
Columbus, OH

Mayor Ellen Tillapaugh
Cooperstown, NY

Mayor Brian Tobin
Cortland, NY

Mayor Biff Traber
Corvallis, OR

Mayor Mary Salas
Chula Vista, CA

Mayor Tim Meerbott
Cutler Bay, FL

Mayor Nan Whaley
Dayton, OH

Mayor Vincent Rosillo
Dobbs Ferry, NY

Mayor David G. Haubert
Dublin, CA

Mayor Roy D. Buol
Dubuque, IA

Mayor Emily Larson
Duluth, MN

Mayor Julie Ward Bujalski
Dunedin, FL

Mayor Nicole Nesby
Duquesne, PA

Mayor Ron Case
Eden Prairie, MN

Mayor Christian Patz
Emeryville, CA

Mayor Joe Schember
Erie, PA

Mayor Steve Hagerty
Evanston, IL

Mayor Colleen Mahr
Fanwood, NJ

Mayor Melanie Piana
Ferndale, MI

Mayor Coral Evans
Flagstaff, AZ

Mayor Yvonne M. Spicer
Framingham, MA

Mayor Lily Mei
Fremont, CA

Mayor Wade Troxell
Fort Collins, CO

Mayor Tom Henry
Fort Wayne, IN

Mayor Leeman Kessler
Gambier, OH

Mayor Jerome Prince
Gary, IN

Mayor Paula Perotte
Goleta, CA

Mayor Rosalynn Bliss
Grand Rapids, MI

Mayor Karylinn Echols
Gresham, OR

Mayor Eric Genrich
Green Bay, WI

Mayor Joy Cooper
Hallandale Beach, FL

Mayor Nicola Armacosti
Hastings-on-Hudson, NY

Mayor Harry Kim
Hawaiii, HI

Mayor Barbara Halliday
Hayward, CA

Mayor Ravinder Bhalla
Hoboken, NJ

Mayor Alex Morse
Holyoke, MA

Mayor Bob Paul
Huntington Woods, MI

Mayor Serge Dedina
Imperial Beach, CA

Mayor Joe Hogsett
Indianapolis, IN

Mayor Derek Dobies
Jackson, MI

Mayor Chokwe A. Lumumba
Jackson, MS

Mayor Steven M. Fulop
Jersey City, NJ

Mayor Derek Kawakami
Kaua’i, HI

Mayor Jose Alvarez
Kissimmee, FL

Mayor Indya Kincannon
Knoxville, TN

Mayor Andrew Hosmer
Laconia, NH

Mayor Adam Paul
Lakewood, CO

Mayor Danene Sorace
Lancaster, PA

Mayor Andy Schor
Lansing, MI

Mayor Ken Miyagishima
Las Cruces, NM

Mayor Craig A. Moe
Laurel, MD

Mayor Theodore Becker
Lewes, DE

Mayor Brian Bagley
Longmont, CO

Mayor Robert Garcia
Long Beach, CA

Mayor Richard Montgomery
Manhattan Beach, CA

Supervisor/Mayor Richard Parete
Marbletown, NY

Mayor Michael Victorino
Maui, HI

Mayor Breanna Lungo-Koehn
Medford, MA

Mayor Paul Brodeur
Melrose, MA

Mayor Jim Strickland
Memphis, TN

Mayor Francis Suarez
Miami, FL

Mayor Dan Gelber
Miami Beach, FL

Mayor Gudrip Bar
Middleton, WI

Mayor Benjamin Florsheim
Middletown, CT

Mayor Mark Gamba
Milwaukie, OR

Mayor Jacob Frey
Minneapolis, MN

Mayor Wayne M. Messam
Miramar, FL

Mayor Emily Niehaus
Moab, UT

Mayor Anne Watson
Montpelier, VT

Mayor Arlene Burns
Mosier, OR

Mayor Jennifer Gregerson
Mukilteo, WA

Mayor John Cooper
Nashville, TN

Mayor Kristopher Larsen
Nederland, CO

Mayor Ras Baraka
Newark, NJ

Mayor Donna Holaday
Newburyport, MA

Mayor Ruthanne Fuller
Newton, MA

Mayor Jon Mitchell
New Bedford, MA

Mayor David Narkewicz
Northampton, MA

Mayor Meredith Leighty
Northglenn, CO

Mayor Libby Schaaf
Oakland, CA

Mayor Cheryl Selby
Olympia, WA

Mayor Andy Beerman
Park City, UT

Mayor Jim Kenney
Philadelphia, PA

Mayor Linda Tyer
Pittsfield, MA

Mayor Kurt Metzger
Pleasant Ridge, MI

Mayor Ted Wheeler
Portland, OR

Mayor Jorge O. Elorza
Providence, RI

Mayor Cory Mason
Racine, WI

Mayor Tom Butt
Richmond, CA

Mayor Levar Stoney
Richmond, VA

Mayor Kim Norton
Rochester, MN

Mayor Caroline McCarley
Rochester, NH

Mayor Lovely Warren
Rochester, NY

Mayor Mike Fournier
Royal Oak, MI

Mayor Darrell Steinberg
Sacramento, CA

Mayor Kimberly Driscoll
Salem, MA

Mayor Erin Mendenhall
Salt Lake City, UT

Mayor London Breed
San Francisco, CA

Mayor Sam Liccardo
San Jose, CA

Mayor Pauline Cutter
San Leandro, CA

Mayor Heidi Harmon
San Luis Obispo, CA

Mayor Gary Philips
San Rafael, CA

Mayor Miguel Pulido
Santa Ana, CA

Mayor Justin Cummings
Santa Cruz, CA

Mayor Kevin McKeown
Santa Monica, CA

Mayor Meg Kelly
Saratoga Springs, NY

Mayor Van Johnson
Savannah, GA

Mayor Jenny Durkan
Seattle, WA

Mayor George Van Dusen
Skokie, IL

Mayor Scott Saunders
Smithville, TX

Mayor Joseph A Curtalone
Somerville, MA

Mayor Sally B. Phillips
South Miami, FL

Mayor Ronald Filippelli
State College, PA

Mayor Michael Tubbs
Stockton, CA

Mayor Lyda Krewson
St. Louis, MO

Mayor Rick Kriseman
St. Petersburg, FL

Mayor Michael J. Ryan
Sunrise, FL

Mayor Thomas W. Fromm
Swedesboro, NJ

Mayor Victoria Woodards
Tacoma, WA

Mayor John E. Dailey
Tallahassee, FL

Mayor Drew Fixell
Tarrytown, NY

Mayor DeLanie Young
Telluride, CO

Mayor Corey Woods
Tempe, AZ

Mayor Patrick J. Furey
Torrance, CA

Mayor Regina Romero
Tucson, AZ

Mayor Dave Chapin
Vail, CO

Mayor Jack McEvoy
Verona, NJ

Mayor Muriel Bowser
Washington, DC

Mayor Rebecca J. Garcia
Watsonville, CA

Mayor Russ Axelrod
West Linn, OR

Mayor Lindsey P. Horvath
West Hollywood, CA

Mayor Keith James
West Palm Beach, FL

Mayor Daniel Corona
West Wendover, NV

Mayor Thomas Roach
White Plains, NY

Mayor Brian Sager
Woodstock, IL

Mayor Lois Richardson
Ypsilanti, MI

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Climate Mayors Urge Congressional Leadership to Advance a Green and Equitable Recovery

198 mayors deliver letter to leaders in D.C. advocating a zero-carbon green economy that creates good-paying jobs and prioritizes equity

Read the letter from Climate Mayors here.

JULY 22, 2020 — Climate Mayors today sent a letter to Congressional leaders urging bold action to protect our planet and build a more just economy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Representing a network of 461 U.S. mayors across the country committed to upholding the Paris Climate Agreement, Climate Mayors called on Congress to invest in an economic recovery that injects more resilience, equity, and sustainability into our communities.

“COVID-19 has laid bare the systemic inequities too often found at the heart of our communities – and when we start to emerge from this crisis, we must rebuild an economy that truly works for everyone,” said Climate Mayors co-founder and Chair, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti. “Every member of the Climate Mayors network is putting health, fairness, and sustainability at the center of our local COVID-19 response and recovery plans, but we need national leadership to kick this work into overdrive and help us strengthen our economies and solve the climate crisis.”

With the focus squarely on rebuilding the economy and country stronger than ever before, the mayors have advocated for a nationwide transition to a zero-carbon economy – a step already happening in cities across the country and a bold move that will create good-paying green jobs, lead to cleaner air and lower emissions, improve public health, support resilience, and lift up our most vulnerable residents.

The global coronavirus pandemic has hit communities of color and low-income families particularly hard – the same families, workers, and neighborhoods who suffer most from the ill effects of climate change, including dangerous emissions, skyrocketing temperatures, intense wildfires, and extreme weather events like floods and hurricanes. Climate Mayors are determined to build a strong, green economy that ensures all Americans are prepared for future health, economic, and environmental shocks.

“Equity is at the heart of all we do in Boston,” said Climate Mayors Co-Chair Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh. “As we work towards an equitable recovery from COVID-19, it’s key we come together to ensure we are strengthening our communities so they are healthy, resilient, and give every resident the same opportunities they deserve.”

“Whether it is climate change or COVID-19, a city’s primary responsibility is to protect our most vulnerable,” said Climate Mayors Co-Chair Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner. “In cities like Houston, that means fighting a global pandemic in the middle of a heat wave and hurricane season. The connection between climate and community health has never been clearer or the need for strong, federal action more important. When we look to recovery, it is not enough to build back; we must build forward and create healthy cities and leaders in a global energy transition.”

Recognizing the need to work together at every level of government to move beyond this devastating pandemic, Climate Mayors strongly urged federal legislators to work with state and city leadership to build new policies and amplify existing programs that have proven effective.

In the letter, Climate Mayors lists several goals that Congress should prioritize as part of the recovery, including:

  • Build for a Better Future: Returning to the status quo is not sufficient in meeting the challenges of climate change and inequities in our communities. We must increase our resolve and ambition to reinvest in America’s communities.
  • Leading with Equity: Federal investments in our municipalities must prioritize those communities who have been left behind, and frontline communities and people of color who have been disproportionately impacted by the effects of climate change and COVID-19.
  • Prioritizing Multiple Benefits: The best investments will create jobs, strengthen communities, and improve health outcomes in our cities and towns.

“For the past five months, Climate Mayors have been on the frontlines responding to the public health and economic crises caused by COVID-19, and to the calls for racial justice across the country,” said James Ritchotte, Director of Climate Mayors. “Amid these intersecting challenges, Climate Mayors remain committed to policies and initiatives that make their communities more just, sustainable, and resilient to future shocks. This work should not be on the shoulders of local leaders alone — cities need constructive partners in our federal government who will prioritize a green and equitable economic recovery.”

The letter includes a sample of recommended policies and programs to advance a just, equitable, and resilient economic recovery that will put Americans back to work and create cleaner, healthier, more livable communities. The policy recommendations are accompanied by success stories from Climate Mayors member cities where similar policies have led to community benefit.

Please find a full version of the letter here.

On July 23, Climate Mayors will be kicking off its National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery, a virtual speaker series advocating for national leadership to prioritize recovery policies that are environmentally sustainable and socially just in the time of COVID-19. The first event will focus on the Southeast with a panel featuring Climate Mayors Steering Committee member Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer, Climate Mayors member Miami Mayor Francis Suarez, Climate Mayors member Columbia Mayor Stephen Benjamin and U.S. Representative Kathy Castor from Florida’s 14th District and Chair of the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis. For more information on the series, you can read the full release here. Register for the July 23 event here.

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About Climate Mayors: Representing 74 million Americans from 48 states, Climate Mayors is a peer-to-peer network of 461 U.S. city mayors who have committed to fighting climate change. Originally founded in 2014, the network’s ranks swelled to almost 400 mayors in response to the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. Climate Mayors commit to taking ambitious action to meet each of their cities’ current climate goals, while working together towards achieving our national Paris targets. Climate Mayors is founded and Chaired by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, and Co-Chaired by Mayors Sylvester Turner (Houston) and Martin J. Walsh (Boston). For more information, please visit www.climatemayors.org.

Media Inquiries: Melody Meyer, mmeyer@bpimedia.com; Grace Hemming, ghemming@bpimedia.com

Climate Mayors Launch National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery

The leadership series will feature conversations in regions across the U.S., highlighting how environmental initiatives will help stimulate local economies, create jobs, improve public health, and reduce carbon emissions in the wake of COVID-19

Read the top takeaways from the series.

Watch the Ohio Valley event’s full panel discussion.

Listen to the Great Lakes event’s full panel discussion.

Watch the Texas event’s full panel discussion.

 Watch the Southeast event’s full panel discussion.

JULY 14, 2020 – Today, Climate Mayors, the network of 453 U.S. mayors committed to upholding the Paris Climate Agreement, announced the Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery, a virtual speaker series advocating for national leadership to prioritize recovery policies that are environmentally sustainable and socially just in the time of COVID-19.

Each livestream event will feature members of Climate Mayors and other leaders from a specific U.S. region, and convene like-minded institutions, partners, and policy makers for a discussion about successful local climate initiatives, and how to drive a just, equitable, and resilient economic recovery. Climate Mayors and partners will also discuss the ways that their sustainability policies prioritize frontline communities and communities of color, who are more likely to be affected by pollution and the negative impacts of climate change.

“When the COVID-19 crisis ends, we have to heed the lessons of this moment in our recovery –– placing communities hit hardest by this pandemic on the path to a more just, sustainable, and healthy future,” said Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, Chair and co-founder of Climate Mayors. “Hailing from every part of the country, Climate Mayors are leading the response today and stand ready to pave the road ahead with climate action that boosts jobs, spurs equitable growth, delivers cleaner air, and lowers emissions for frontline families.”

The Climate Mayors National Dialogue on Green and Equitable Recovery will kick off later this month in the Southeast with a panel featuring Climate Mayors Steering Committee member Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer, Climate Mayors member Miami Mayor Francis Suarez, Climate Mayors member Columbia Mayor Stephen Benjamin, and US Representative Kathy Castor from Florida’s 14th District and Chair of the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis, moderated by veteran journalist Tom O’Hara of The Invading Sea, a collaboration of 26 news organizations that cover climate change in Florida. Watch the full panel discussion. 

Events later in the summer and fall will feature Climate Mayors and partners from the Great Lakes region, Texas, Louisiana, and Pennsylvania. For more Information on the upcoming Climate Mayors livestream panel discussions, including dates and times as they are announced, please visit www.climatemayors.org.

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About Climate Mayors: Representing 72 million Americans from 48 states, Climate Mayors is a diverse network of 453 U.S. city leaders who have committed to fighting climate change. Originally founded in 2014, the network’s ranks swelled to almost 400 mayors in response to the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. Climate Mayors commit to taking ambitious action to meet each of their cities’ current climate goals, while working together towards achieving our national Paris targets. Climate Mayors is founded and Chaired by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, and Co-Chaired by Mayors Sylvester Turner (Houston) and Martin J. Walsh (Boston). For more information, please visit www.climatemayors.org.

Media Contact: Melody Meyer, mmeyer@bpimedia.com; Grace Hemming, ghemming@bpimedia.com

Climate Mayors Network Announces Steering Committee to Strengthen City Climate Action

Committee will serve to galvanize city climate leadership among Climate Mayors’ 400+ network members

City climate leadership increasingly important as federal government has taken a back seat in addressing the global climate crisis

DECEMBER 3, 2019 – Today, Climate Mayors, the network of 438 U.S. mayors across the country committed to upholding the Paris Climate Agreement, announced the launch of a new Steering Committee, led by twenty-four mayors who will serve as critical voices within the network and across the country to spotlight climate leadership exhibited in cities throughout the United States. The Climate Mayors’ Steering Committee makes clear that mayors across the country have and will continue to step up and lead on climate, regardless of the decisions made at the federal level.

The Steering Committee will work alongside the Climate Mayors’ Chair, Mayor Eric Garcetti, and Co-Chairs, Mayors Madeline Rogero, Sylvester Turner, and Martin J. Walsh to highlight the importance of city-led climate action in creating healthier, cleaner, and more equitable and sustainable cities. The Steering Committee will also work to catalyze membership and more deeply engage their regions, as well as showcase the impactful work of existing Climate Mayors and how cities are helping meet the scope and the scale of the challenge posed by climate change.

After President Trump announced his initial plans to withdraw the U.S. from the landmark Paris Agreement in June 2017, more than 300 mayors joined the Climate Mayors coalition and pledged to continue working toward the goals of the Agreement in their cities. The network has since grown to over 400 mayors, both Democrat and Republican, who represent cities ranging in size and region and show the overwhelming support for climate action among the majority of Americans.

“Cities across our country and around the world see the impacts of climate change firsthand — and we stand front and center in the fight to address this crisis with every tool at our disposal,” said Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti. “No matter what happens on the national level, cities know we cannot afford any more debates or delays, so we will continue to act to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement, protect our most vulnerable residents, strengthen global health, and create a green economy that works for everyone.”

“Our Steering Committee mayors are climate action leaders, both within their communities and within our network. We appreciate their willingness to step up and support Climate Mayors in building greater political will for action at the federal and global level,” Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero said.  

“The strength and moral standing of Climate Mayors is derived from the broad and diverse population we represent,” said Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner. “Whether you are a big city or a small city, in a red state or a blue state, climate change affects us all. Mayors across the country are making a bold commitment to build stronger, more resilient cities and a more sustainable future. We are stronger together and I look forward to working with these mayors as we face this great challenge.”

“Climate change is the defining challenge of our time, and we need the support of all mayors to truly make a difference on this global issue,” said Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh. “As a coastal city, Boston is at the frontlines of this crisis, and I look forward to joining my fellow mayors as we lead with plans, solutions and results.”

“The Climate Mayors network is more than four hundred strong, and counting,” said James Ritchotte, Director of Climate Mayors. “We’re excited to have these twenty-four mayors lead us in showcasing the important work of cities and maximizing the collective impact of Climate Mayors across the country who are fighting climate change in their communities.”

The following mayors are members of the Climate Mayors Steering Committee:

  1. Steve Adler (Austin, TX)
  2. Ethan Berkowitz (Anchorage, AK)
  3. Jim Brainard (Carmel, IN)
  4. Michael Cahill (Beverly, MA)
  5. Kirk Caldwell (Honolulu, HI)
  6. LaToya Cantrell (New Orleans, LA)
  7. Melvin Carter (Saint Paul, MN)
  8. Jane Castor (Tampa, FL)
  9. Frank Cownie (Des Moines, IA)
  10. Bill de Blasio (New York City)
  11. Mike Duggan (Detroit, MI)
  12. Buddy Dyer (Orlando, FL)
  13. Kevin Faulconer (San Diego, CA)
  14. Greg Fischer (Louisville, KY)
  15. Kate Gallego (Phoenix, AZ)
  16. Michael Hancock (Denver, CO)
  17. James Hovland (Edina, MN)
  18. Eric Johnson (Dallas, TX)
  19. Lioneld Jordan (Fayetteville, AR)
  20. Tim Keller (Albuquerque, NM)
  21. Ron Nirenberg (San Antonio, TX)
  22. Bill Peduto (Pittsburgh, PA)
  23. Satya Rhodes-Conway (Madison, WI)
  24. Lucy Vinis (Eugene, OR)

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Media Inquiries: Carey Hickox, chickox@bpimedia.com

About Climate Mayors

Climate Mayors, founded in 2014, is a diverse network of U.S. city leaders who have committed to fighting climate change. In response to the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement, the network’s ranks swelled to more than 400 U.S. mayors from across the country who have committed to taking ambitious action to meet each of their cities’ current climate goals, while working together towards achieving our national Paris targets. Climate Mayors is founded and Chaired by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, and Co-Chaired by Mayors Madeline Rogero (Knoxville), Sylvester Turner (Houston) and Martin J. Walsh (Boston). For more information, please visit www.climatemayors.org.